Recent Reports & Resources

Recent Reports & Resources

When it comes to embracing environmentally friendly technologies, recycling may not be as exciting as solar panels or hybrid cars, but it’s one area where consumers can make a huge difference.

Through municipal recycling programs, specific types of post-consumer plastics are collected, processed for recycling, and used to create an array of second-generation products – everything from fleece jackets and bottles for beverages and detergents to carpeting and even high-end composite lumber for outdoor decking.

There have been many recent announcements on plastics including building a circular economy for plastics, improved recycling through extended producer responsibility (EPR), single-use reduction and many other topics. The following reports are some of the latest updates on the state of the recycling industry.

CCME Canada-Wide Action Plan on Zero Plastics Waste – released June 26, 2019

The report delves into areas of focus over the next few months to a few years down the road to make changes in how we use and manage plastics. Six areas of focus include: 

  • facilitate consistent Extended Producer Responsibility programs;
  • address priority single-use and disposable products;
  • national performance requirements and standards;
  • incentives for a circular economy, infrastructure and innovation investments; and
  • public procurement and green operations.

Economic Study of the Canadian Plastics Industry, Markets and Waste: Summary Report

The report delves into areas of focus over the next few months to a few years down the road to make changes in how we use and manage plastics. Six areas of focus include:

  • Raw material production
  • Plastics products manufacturing
  • End use in key sectors
  • Analysis of end-of-life

Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development: The Last Straw: Turning the Tide on Plastic Pollution in Canada – Released June 2019

A number of recommendations:

  • There is a need for coordinated action
  • Plastic toxicity should be assessed through the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
  • Standardization is key to increasing plastic recycling
  • Fostering recycling
  • Funding is required to foster innovation to modernize recycling
  • Canadians need better information to be fully engaged
  • The Federal Government can set an example through its procurement

Smart Prosperity Institute – A vision for a circular economy for plastics in Canada 

 

Canadian Plastics Industry Association – Recycling reports